Improvised rock. My moment of fame.


After the tedious Dixie’s Tupperware Party show on the Fringe last week I had dinner at The Dogs in Hanover Street.  Bloody hell, it was brilliant.  Lamb Sweetbreads to start with (revoltingly delicious) followed by Slow Cooked Belly of Pork (Yummy).

After that we headed to the pub next door to be greeted by a hippy/goth bloke inviting us to see/join in with his experimental band.  So I did.  Called the A Band they apparently change their name every time they gig.

Given they had no drum kit I had to opt for my second calling; lead vocals.  And so a happy half hour passed by.

A bit like this sort of stuff man.

Dixies Tupperware party


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Ok.  I was in the minority.  I didn’t fancy this show much in the first place I admit but I didn’t expect it to be quite so lame.

I really hate the way that comedy has overwhelmed the Fringe.  And by that I mean it’s more of a Comedy festival than the Comedy Festival.

And if all comedy is this bad I pity the audiences at this year’s festival/fringe.

Why don’t they do something a bit more adventurous and go and see some drama? (There’s still plenty of it hidden away)

It’s just a three minute sketch dragged out to a mind numbing hour (and arse numbing as a matter of fact because the seats at the Wildman Rooms at The Assembly are VERY uncomfortable if you’re any taller than 5’5″).

But what do I know.  The audience loved it.  Sort of.

The Last Witch by The Traverse Theatre Company at The Lyceum


The-Last-Witch

Me and Mrs G went to see this highly recommended production yesterday and just managed to squeeze in with the last two seats in the theatre.

Let’s start on a plus note.  The visual effects are stunning as is most of the acting, but especially the quite extraordinary Kath Howden.  the music and sound add greatly to the experience and my overall take on it was positive.  Good but not great I’d say.

The story is interesting and the dialogue is really good but something was missing for me (and I suspect most of the audience because the applause at the end was more grateful and polite than raucous).

It’s about the burning of The Last Witch in Scotland (in Dornach of all places in 1727) and I liked the way the story really centered on this madwoman’s affection for her daughter and her blind belief that she was indeed a witch when in fact she was really just an illusionist (and olden days junkie).  The story of the daughter (played beautifully by Hannah Donaldson) was what actually gripped me most because there was just the suggestion that she (not her mother) might indeed be touched by the hand of the devil.

Rona Munro, in her programme notes, told us that there were many ways she could have told the tale (one thought was that the Witch may have had an ancient version of Alzheimers) and although I very much enjoyed the dialogue I just felt it missed a beat somewhere along the way.