Best of 2010. Music.


It’s been an epic musical year.

The best for longer than I can remember.

We’ve had great dance (Crystal Castles, Hot Chip)

We’ve had great folk (Villagers, Midlake, Anais Mitchell)

Great indie (Arcade Fire, Sleigh Bells, I am Kloot)

Great pop (Cee Lo Green, Glee, Paolo Nutini – well that’s a hangover from 2009 that’s just grown and grown on me, Rumer and Fyfe Dangerfield)

Great rock (Arcade Fire, Robert Plant)

Great balladry (Corrine Bailey Rae, Rumer, Tracey Thorn, Gil Scott Heron, I am Kloot again, John Grant)

And then there’s been a few oldies that have crept through into my particular headspace (Dead Kennedies, E.M.A.K)

Here is the full top 20 listing…

I am producing my usual year end CD (since 2004)

I think this is the best yet.  Certainly the greatest strength in depth.

If you want a copy let me know.

Mobile Me. Fail. Viral hell.


Mobile wee more like.

I’ve never been able to get Mail on my Mac to work.  And the more I’ve tried the more it has simply fucked up my computer.  But the biggest mistake I’ve ever mad with Apple was to sign up for Mobile Me.

It didn’t work, so I canceled it.

But now, every half hour or so, a syncing message pops up on my screen trying to sync Mobile Me with Yahoo Mail.  Despite the fact that I have apprently eradicated it from my machine.

I have had four online helpdesk chats with Apple (helpful but unsuccesful) and it still plagues me.

Apple.  It sucks.  (Can anyone help me rid this cancer?)

I have tried removing everything about .mac and mobile me from my Keychain but it simply does not work.

You know that “Macs don’t get viruses thing?”

Yeah they do.

From Apple.

Monsters


My movie-going year is suitably bookended by two Road movie love stories, each with a flavour of the apocalypse about them.  In January, The Road took Cormac McCarthy’s seminal novel and told a love story about father and son that has seldom been rivalled.  Now, in December a young British director has created a love story that is the year’s best, as a sci fantasy and for half a million dollars.  How is this possible?

Written, directed, filmed and CGI’d by the quite remarkable Gareth Edwards, this film is an absolute joy from the first slate to the last.

At every single turn he avoids excess.  The film is so lean it ‘s positively fat free.

The CGI could be Oscar winning if the Academy decide that a Sci Fi movie with CGI you barely notice at times deserves such an accolade. The cinematography is sublime and yet is filmed on a $8,400 camera (My guess is it may have been a Canon because Canon is strongly product placed throughout).

The acting, although not award winning is perfectly good.

It’s a two man show featuring the very able Whitney Able (great too in “All the Boys Love Mandy Lane) looking like a young Charlize Theron, sans scars, and Scoot McNairy.

There’s no doubt which of the pair is more likely to feature in Edwards’ next movie.  The camera absolutely drools over Able for long periods of time, but hey, who’s complaining.  Reminded me a little of Bertolucci and his penchant for ravishing his young female talent on screen.

He uses a lot of very tight depth of field which, if you like it, creates a lovely soft feel with the action often moving in and ourt of focus.  This adds quality and emphasises the beauty of the surroundings that are being destroyed in a war between the US Army/Airforce and aliens who landed in New Mexico six years prior.

Of course it’s like District Nine (everyone says so) but I prefer to compare it to Apocalypse Now (and The Road).  I think Edwards might thank me for that because the movie is essentially a trip up river (as in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness) and he has a couple of homage moments, most particularly in the Army’s motivational music;  The Ryde of the Valkyries.

The day we saw this the cinema was full of young delinquents who were clearly unimpressed.

Barely a monster in sight.

Next to no blood.

Boring.

Alien vs Predator this is not!

My daughter and I  on the other hand were enthralled.

A fine, fine debut and most certainly one of the films of the year.