Oscars. Should win. Will win.


Best Picture

Should Win

Birdman (although I also loved the marmitey Under The Skin – not nominated)

Will win

Boyhood

Best Director

Should win

Alejandro G. Iñárritu

Will win

Alejandro G. Iñárritu

Actor in a leading role

Should win

Michael Keaton

Will Win

Michael Keaton

Actresss in a leading role

Should win

Julianne Moore

Will Win

Julianne Moore

Supporting Actor

Should win

JK Simmons

Will Win

JK Simmons

Supporting actress

Should win

Patricia Arqutte

Will Win

Patricia Arquette

Original Screenplay

Should win

Grand Budapest Hotel

Will Win

Birdman

Adapted Screenplay

Should win

Only seen whiplash so can’t call this.

Cinematography

Should win

Birdman

Will Win

Birdman

Other predictions…

Animated feature

How to Train your Dragon 2

Costume

Grand Budapest

Editing

Whiplash

Foreign Language

Leviathon

Make up

Grand Budapest

Production Design

Grand Budapest

Sound mixing

Whiplash

Visual Effects

Interstellar

Music

Interstellar (Hans Zimmer)

Boyhood review


Boyhood_film

If, as expected, Boyhood wins Best Motion Picture of the Year at the Oscars later this month it will be at the expense of better films.

It’s a low budget, ‘indie’ movie and has a strong feeling of the pet project about it, yet it’s risen to astonishing heights since its debut at the Sundance Film Festival last year.

And in an Oscar year where perhaps more than ever before the best movie nominations are dominated by arthouse films – Birdman, Whiplash, Grand Budapest Hotel, The Imitation Game and The Theory of Everything must all fall into that category – it’s the one that’s picking up the big prizes. (Golden Globes and BAFTAs are already in the bag.)  But Birdman, Whiplash and Grand Budapest Hotel are all, for my money, vastly superior creations.

If you haven’t seen it, and that’s entirely possible because it came and went in the blink of an eye – not troubling the schedulers in your local multiplex, it’s a truly original piece of filmmaking.  Shot over 12 years it tracks the growing up of five-year old Texan boy, Mason, right through to his High School graduation. Along the way his mother (played brilliantly and actually the real grit at the heart of this movie) by Patricia Arquette works her way through a series of unfortunate relationships and marriages.  With a minimum of fuss the movie shows the whole family (Mason’s estranged father, Ethan Hawke, his mother and sister) visibly age on screen as they traverse all that life throws at them.

But the truth is it has divided its audience with many suggesting it’s actually just plain boring; lacking, as it does, any conventional sense of plot.  I wouldn’t personally go that far as I found it absorbing, only outstaying its welcome inn the final reel, but it’s just not as good as its reputation.

Sure, it’s impossible to argue with the sheer ambition of making a movie over 12 years but once you’re into it it’s not THAT incredible.  Mason, for a start is not developed as a character greatly and the only real ‘performances’ as such are from Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke who, to be fair, are both excellent.

But if I were giving out the Oscars I’m not sure this would even make the shortlist.  For me it would be a straight shoot out between Birdman and Whiplash with Birdman just edging it for its sheer originality.