Dicktionary pic of the day #23


The ‘Pictionary’ round in my weekly music quiz has proven to be a hit so I’m sharing it here.

My ‘drawers’ have 30 seconds to recreate a classic record, either from seeing the sleeve (as in this one), or by being given the name of a song.

The results are the basis of this simple question.

Day 23

What classic album cover is this?

Answer given tomorrow.

Please don’t answer here but please do click like if you think you know.

Answer to Day 22

Dicktionary pic of the day #22.


The ‘Pictionary’ round in my weekly music quiz has proven to be a hit so I’m sharing it here.

My ‘drawers’ have 30 seconds to recreate a classic record, either from seeing the sleeve (as in this one), or by being given the name of a song.

The results are the basis of this simple question.

Day 22

What classic album cover is this? 

Answer given tomorrow.

Please don’t answer here but please do click like if you think you know.

Answer to Day 21

Dicktionary Pic of the day #16.


The ‘Pictionary’ round in my weekly music quiz has proven to be a hit so I’m sharing it here.

My ‘drawers’ have 30 seconds to recreate a classic record, either from seeing the sleeve (as in this one), or by being given the name of a song.

The results are the basis of this simple question.

Day 16

What classic album cover is this?

Screenshot 2020-06-03 at 18.14.16

Answer given tomorrow.

Please don’t answer here but please do click like if you think you know.

Answer to Day 15

Screenshot 2020-06-01 at 09.23.27

Screenshot 2020-06-01 at 09.23.21

Dicktionary pic of the day #14.


The ‘Pictionary’ round in my weekly music quiz has proven to be a hit so I’m sharing it here.

My ‘drawers’ have 30 seconds to recreate a classic record, either from seeing the sleeve (as in this one), or by being given the name of a song.

The results are the basis of this simple question.

Day 14

What classic album cover is this?Screenshot 2020-06-01 at 09.22.56

Answer given tomorrow.

Please don’t answer here but please do click like if you think you know.

Answer to Day 13

Screenshot 2020-05-29 at 19.37.51

Screenshot 2020-06-01 at 09.23.07

Dictionary Pic of the day #13.


The ‘Pictionary’ round in my weekly music quiz has proven to be a hit so I’m sharing it here.

My ‘drawers’ have 30 seconds to recreate a classic record, either from seeing the sleeve (as in this one), or by being given the name of a song.

The results are the basis of this simple question.

Day 13

What classic album cover is this?

Screenshot 2020-05-29 at 19.37.51

Answer given tomorrow.

Please don’t answer here but please do click like if you think you know.

Answer to Day 12

Screenshot 2020-05-28 at 21.00.56

Screenshot 2020-05-28 at 21.01.07

Dicktionary Pic of the Day #11


The ‘Pictionary’ round in my weekly music quiz has proven to be a hit so I’m sharing it here.

My ‘drawers’ have 30 seconds to recreate a classic record, either from seeing the sleeve (as in this one), or by being given the name of a song.

The results are the basis of this simple question.

Day 11

What classic album cover is this?

Screenshot 2020-05-27 at 14.00.10

Answer given tomorrow.

Please don’t answer here but please do click like if you think you know.

Answer to Day 10

Screenshot 2020-05-26 at 15.10.22

Screenshot 2020-05-26 at 15.10.38

 

Dicktionary Pic of the day #10


The ‘Pictionary’ round in my weekly music quiz has proven to be a hit so I’m sharing it here.

My ‘drawers’ have 30 seconds to recreate a classic record, either from seeing the sleeve (as in this one), or by being given the name of a song.

The results are the basis of this simple question.

Day 10

What classic album cover is this?

Screenshot 2020-05-26 at 15.10.22

Answer given tomorrow.

Please don’t answer here but please do click like if you think you know.

Answer to Day 9

Screenshot 2020-05-25 at 19.48.49

Screenshot 2020-05-25 at 19.49.01

Dicktionary Pic of the Day #6.


The ‘Pictionary’ round in my weekly music quiz has proven to be a hit so I’m sharing it here.

My ‘drawers’ have 30 seconds to recreate a classic record, either from seeing the sleeve (as in this one), or by being given the name of a song.

The results are the basis of this simple question.

Day 6

What classic album cover is this?

Screenshot 2020-05-22 at 13.50.02

Answer given tomorrow.

Please don’t answer here but please do click like if you think you know.

Answer to Day 5

Screenshot 2020-05-21 at 14.04.12

Screenshot 2020-05-21 at 14.00.47

Dicktionary Pic of the day #5


The ‘Pictionary’ round in my weekly music quiz has proven to be a hit so I’m sharing it here.

My ‘drawers’ have 30 seconds to recreate a classic record, either from seeing the sleeve (as in this one), or by being given the name of a song.

The results are the basis of this simple question.

Day 4

What classic album cover is this?

Screenshot 2020-05-21 at 14.04.12

Answer given tomorrow.

Please don’t answer here but please do click like if you think you know.

Answer to Day 4

Screenshot 2020-05-20 at 06.28.40

Screenshot 2020-05-20 at 06.29.06

Dictionary Pic of the day #4.


The ‘Pictionary’ round in my weekly music quiz has proven to be a hit so I’m sharing it here.

My ‘drawers’ have 30 seconds to recreate a classic record, either from seeing the sleeve (as in this one), or by being given the name of a song.

The results are the basis of this simple question.

Day 4

What classic (but low-selling punk) album cover is this?

Screenshot 2020-05-20 at 06.28.40

Answer given tomorrow.

Please don’t answer here but please do click like if you think you know.

Answer to Day 3

Screenshot 2020-05-19 at 08.47.17

Screenshot 2020-05-20 at 06.28.56

Upright. New TV series by Tim Minchin.


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I’ll start by confessing that Tim Minchin has done nothing.  NOTHING for me in his fairly long and, largely, highly succesful career, so when it was suggested I watch this I doubted I’d get past episode one.

How wrong could I have been?

By the end of episode eight, binged in two days, the tears rolled down my cheeks.

It’s bawdy, ballsy, rude, ridiculous, hilarious, breathtaking, touching, sincere and is based on a largely unpredictable storyline that twists and turns like a Tasmanian Devil.

It also features a stand out, frankly equal footing, performance by 19 year old Australian actress, Milly Alcock, remember that name, she’s the next Margot Robbie.

A truly excellent TV series, right up there with Succession, Fleabag and Chernobyl as my favourites of 2019.

 

Suspiria: Film review.


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I was thrilled to see the original of this movie by Dario Argento at Summerhall in Edinburgh during this year’s Fringe with the original score performed by Goblin, live on stage.

It was a great experience but, in my view, it’s an overhyped movie with little to recommend other than the astonishing score and the remarkable cinematography in its vivid, over-saturated colour.

The film itself is pretty unremarkable.,

But it was enough to tempt me into seeing the remake which is, in my view, much more remarkable.

It’s an incredibly odd follow on from director Luca Gaudanino’s “Call Me By Your Name’ – a touching and sentimental coming of age gay romance set in Italy and starring the incredible Timothy Chalomet.

This leaps genres like I’ve rarely seen a director do.

Gaudanino’s remake has none of the zing of the original, indeed the colour palette is quite muted.  It’s also dull throughout as a result of the endless rain (then snow).

It’s set in 1977 West Berlin with the Baader-Meinhoff (RAF) gang in full flow and providing a sinister backdrop to what is already a sinister movie.

Guadanino casts Dakota Johnson (50 Shades of Grey) and a malevolent Tilda Swinton brilliantly, but I also liked the performance of Mia Goth as Johnson’s best friend in a crazy dance school.

The award winning dance school that Johnson seeks and gains entrance too after a remarkable audition is actually a witches coven and Johnson appears to be the next sacrificial lamb to the God the witches worship.

But it’s not that straightforward.

It’s a long, slow, considered movie with an inevitable Sixth Act (yes it’s presented in six acts) denouement that’s a fantastic gore-fest.

The movie is getting mixed reviews and I understand that.  It’s really slow.  It’s arthouse not shock mall theatre.  If you want Halloween forget it.

But it’s great.

Really well directed and acted and Thom Yorke’s score is great although less intrusive than Goblin’s.

Recommended.

Cold War: Movie Review.


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The first thing to state about this beautiful movie is that it’s monochrome.  So stunningly so that at times you feel you are in a photographic gallery rather than a cinema.  The quality of the cinematography is quite extraordinary thanks to Lucas Zal.

It’s also in 4:3 format.  Not the square format of Instagram, but close.

We don’t see 4:3 very often these days but Wes Anderson used it to immense effect in Grand Budapest Hotel and so did Lazslo Melis in Son of Saul.

It’s an engaging format that draws you in.  It suggests a time before cinemascope (16:9 etc) and only really works in period cinema of a time.

This time.

But it also lends itself to incredible framing, such as when our female protagonist floats down a river gradually disappearing out of shot, and later in the movie when the chief protagonists leave a bus and walk out of frame in a composition that Henri Cartier Breson would be proud of.

It’s one of the most beautiful movies I’ve seen in many years.

In truth that’s probably its biggest strength.

It is, but it isn’t really, narrative driven.  More episodic than story, but it does tell a tale about director Pawel Pawlikowski’s parents’ love affair set against the Cold War backdrop in his native Poland.

It’s fairly sordid in a way (his mother was abused by her father as a child) but without anything shocking to see.

Imagine, yes.

The two leads ( Joanna Kulig and Tomasz Kot) are magnificent.  Brooding, beautiful (although unconventionally so) and real.

Lucas Zal has a great time dwelling on three particular things.  Crowd shots.  Amazing, Dance sequences. Amazing.  Joanna Kulig (the lead).  Amazing.

In particular, Joanna Kulig has a stand out performance.  She’s not one to show her enjoyment in life.  Sullen most would say.  But it is an immense performance.

It’s a love story, set against the challenges that Cold War Poland put in front of people of artistic belief where communist doctrine made creativity very difficult.

What Pawel Pawlikowski achieves is a mood piece of exemplary, peerless really, detail.

And it’s a musical.

I was constantly drawn to comparing it to La La Land, yet it is so NOT La La Land.  Partly it’s down to Kulig who shares the unorthodox looks (beauty) of Emma Stone.  Partly it’s the framing of scenes by Zal.

And the music fuses from Polish country folk to French basement jazz (which La La Land would have been so comfortable with).

This is an Oscar nomination shoe in.  It’s absolutely brilliant.

And, at 88 minutes, certainly does not outstay its welcome.

Bravo!

A Straight 10 from me.

 

 

 

Possibly the worst Mercury Prize Shortlist ever…


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Unbelievably mainstream.  Some genuinely rubbish records on it (Florence and the Machine).  Entirely lacking in class.

My vote is for Arctic Monkeys but the best act on the list is Nadine Shah.

  • Arctic Monkeys
  • Everything Everything
  • Richard Russell
  • Florence and the Machine
  • Jorja Smith
  • King Krule
  • Lily Allen
  • Nadine Shah
  • Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds
  • Novelist
  • Sons of Kemet
  • Wolf Alice

No Young Fathers?  Fuck off.

No Jon Hopkins?  Fuck off.

No Gogo Penguin?  Fuck off.

Anna Meredith Opens the Proms tonight.


I first fell in love with Anna Meredith when she supported Anna Calvi at the, now defunct, The Caves in Glasgow.  It was a bonkers performance and I adored it.  I bought her SAY award winning Varmints soon after and saw her live at Leith Theatre last year opening Hidden Doors Festival.  The best gig I saw in 2017.

My appreciation of her was actually behind the curve because she had already established herself as a highly regarded composer in modern classical circles and that is one of the reasons she will open The Proms tonight and the Edinburgh Festival in August with a commissioned piece about WWI called 5 Telegrams.

Even though I consider myself a big fan nothing, NOTHING, could prepare me for this.  This awesome, really nothing short of awesome, performance in the Tiny Desk Concerts series.  I thought Penguin Cafe had kicked it out of the park a couple of years ago in this series but this kicks it out of the park next door too.

Sit back, relax and enjoy Nautilus (surely the greatest piece of music ever written for the tuba), Ribbons (she even sings, who knew?) and The Vapours.

19 minutes and 4 seconds of utter bliss.  Thank you Anna.

Three. Is the magic number. Calling all you Intelligent Finance [sic] customers out there.


Is Intelligent Finance the dumbest bank in the world?

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0845 xxx xxxx. Intelligent Finance’s Home Page and Security Page contact number.

This morning I thought “It’s champagne time – Intelligent Finance [sic] have, after 3 years of constantly asking them, updated their customer phone number”.
But no, only on 2 of their 3 customer facing pages.
The one when you are actually looking at your account is STILL WRONG.
They’re still Dullard Finance.
Incompetence beyond comprehension frankly.

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0345 xxx xxxx.  Intelligent Finance’s Accounts Page, where you can see your balance etc and might decide you need to call them to query something – by now you are through security and, of course, failed to write down the correct phone number while you were there on the assumption that the number would be correct throughout the site.  But, you know when happens when you assume.  Yes,  U make and ASS out of ME

 So, as I entitled this elegant thought-piece, Three. Is the magic number.  As I will leave De la Soul to prove.

American Honey: Movie review


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Andrea Arnold’s debut movie, Red Road, is a shocking social documentary style movie that is breathtaking in its boldness and unflinching in its depiction of a Glasgow underclass that most of us do not know.  American Honey does a similar job of depicting an American class that’s seldom caught on screen and was cast mainly from the street.

It too is pretty unflinching in its depiction of drug taking, young sex and the unwinding of an American dream; of sorts.

It’s a road movie that follows the fortunes of 18 year old abused runaway, Star, and her relationship with a group of young magazine salespeople touring the country looking for door to door sales in a variety of American housing schemes (both rich and poor).

It leads to an episodic series of events that range from amusing to totally horrific.

Arnold’s style is uncompromising.  It, like Grand Budapest Hotel, is shot in square (Instagram) format which gives it a certain contemporaneity and the photography, that is mainly cinema verite, occasionally bursts into beautiful, glorious, rich warmth such that it takes your breath away.

It’s a compelling performance by Sasha Lane as Star and Shia LaBeouf also impresses as her mentor and, later, lover.  Riley Keogh is also excellent as the aloof, slightly terrifying team leader who lives a separate life of relative luxury while her band of stoner sales people rough it in hostels.

But it’s an uncomfortable ride that rewards your patience.

Glasto Lite.


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Having  been unable to get tickets for Glastonbury for a few years now I am about to experience the Catalonian equivalent with a cheeky wee trip to Barcelona for Primavera Sound.

Top of my list of, and possible, just about, ‘to see’ are…

  • Solange
  • Bon Iver
  • Kate Tempest
  • Aphex Twin
  • King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard
  • Sinkane
  • Magnetic Fields (Playing the ED Fest in August)
  • Arab Strap
  • the xx
  • Sleaford Mods
  • Jamie XX
  • Songhoy Blues
  • Van Morrison
  • Metronomy
  • Teenage Fanclub
  • Grace Jones
  • Arcade Fire
  • Wild Beasts
  • Japandroids

Of these my number one pick is King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard.  Check out Gamma Knife, their best song.  They have many best songs.

Recent Listening: Penguin Cafe, The Imperfect Sea.


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Not to be confused with The Penguin Cafe Orchestra that disbanded upon the untimely death of its leader Simon Jeffes in 2007, the Penguin Cafe is actually a different band, although it includes some of the previous members and is led by Simon Jeffes’ son, Arthur.

Live, The Penguin Cafe play many of The Penguin Cafe Orchestra’s favourite pieces and it has been my privilege to enjoy them live twice (Usher Hall, Edinburgh and Glastonbury) but they record in their own right and The Imperfect Sea is their third, and best, album.

I read that Arthur was concerned that this latest recording was taking them to new places and ran the risk of disaffecting long term PCO fans.  I can reassure you Arthur that you have done no such thing.

It’s a bobbydazzler.  It really is.

It’s far from imperfect.

The sound, as my good friend and long term PCO aficionado, Jon Stevenson, said to me the other day lacks some of the humour of the PCO and he is right. The Penguin Cafe are a more serious bunch of musicians and their output is perhaps more orchestral than the PCO which was more folky in totality, but this matters not a jot when the quality is so high.

I’ve listened to The Imperfect Sea 5 or 6 times in the last few days and there is nary an off note.  Sure, the first time I listened I was riding my bike and the constant ‘ping’ of cycle bell on Cantorum was a mite discombobulating, but it’s endearing also and hearkens back towards the PCO’s playfulness.  (It has a small debt to pay to the mighty Telephone and Rubber Band).

Ricecar, the opener, is a classic of sequenced music and is certainly of the PCO school.

Overall this is a mighty addition to the PC/PCO canon.

Fully operational hi-fi.


To regain full use of one’s hi-fi is a first world delight.

My turntable has been operating on a semi-functional basis for some time until I bit the bullet and took it to Hi Fi Repairs – a one man operation on Clarke St in Edinburgh.

£48 later.

The man is a genius.

He can repair anything; including my 30 year old Castle speakers and now my 30 year old Ariston Q Deck. (It seems it does go on and on and on and Ariston.)

So I have christened it with Talking Heads, Remain in Light.

Not a bad choice.  Please enjoy with me.

 

 

Desert Island Discs is 75: An appreciation.


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I’d like to say I’ve grown up with Desert Island Discs, but the truth is I was a terrible snob about ‘middle class radio’ in my disapproval of it as a youth.  I was brought up in the punk era. DID did not fit with the zeitgeist.  (I didn’t even give Led Zeppelin the time of day then, for God sake.)

I remain a terrible snob in different ways today.

For example, when it comes to class and political affiliations I’m a mess.

I feel like a Liberal but don’t vote Liberal.  I voted Yes for Independence in Scotland but am beginning to mistrust the SNP as they have unfettered power.  I deplore the Tories, but love Kenneth Clark.  I would not vote Labour but hugely admire Jeremy Corbyn.  I love the Greens but they are too hippy dippy for me.

When it comes to music I can’t abide the current state of the charts but am fully doting on BBC Radio 6 and its general output, yet when I open The Skinny to look at their best of the year I barely recognise a band and worry that I am losing touch.

My best of 2016 included David Bowie, Radiohead, De La Soul, King Creosote, Nick Cave, A Tribe called Quest, Massive Attack, Mogwai, Pixies.

Dad Rock (and Dad Hip hop) if ever you saw it.  Not one a day under 50 years old and Seaford Mods are not far off it either.

So where does DID fit in to all this?

Right at the top of the tree.  That’s where.

My aforementioned ‘political disdain’ for Radio 4 has long been eroded and DID sits as the King of the BBC’s castle, patrolling the battlements the real life Queen, Kirsty Young.  Surely the greatest voice and most empathetic interviewer to ever grace the world of radio.

I listen to the archives and cannot bear the sound of the Wicked Witch of the West that preceded her; Sue Lawley.  Where Kirsty embraces, Lawley shunned.  Where Kirsty giggles, Lawley sneered or simply tossed off a harumphlike snort.

Parky was good though and so was Roy Plomley in that so very BBC era.

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The beauty of DID is that it gets under the skin of its interviewees like no other programme.  Sure, the music can be special but the formula (and it’s ingenious mixologist) works at pulling the truth from people.  Not the scandalous truth but the personal truth.

How they really felt about their mum and dad.

Why they were turned from the straight and narrow for a while (no REALLY why).

What embarrassing (but not headline) secrets they have.

How childhood bullying made them.

These sorts of things.

If you want to hear that in an absolute nutshell listen to the enthralling interview with Kathy Burke.  And try not to cry.

Listen to how Atul Gawande saved thousands of lives by creating a checklist for surgeons.  Genuinely inspiring.

I’ve not yet heard the Tom Hanks interview but I understand he was reduced to tears by Kirsty, but in a very nice way.

Lemm Sissey, a poet, was another who brought me to tears as he told his adoption story.

This programme does not tolerate big heads.  How could you show off with Kirsty anyway? Although, there was probably more opportunity in Lawley’s days, because I think she was more in the thrall of her big shot interviewees.  Kirtsty often is too, but in a completely different way.  Like a little girl mouth agape at her first Spice Girls gig sort of way rather than a Lawley “look at me interviewing Henry Kissinger ” way.

The list of the most chosen pieces reflects an aspect of the show that I think represents its strictly middle class past, because over the last ten years this picture must have changed.

Beethoven – Symphony No 9 in D minor ‘Choral’
Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto No 2 in C minor
Schubert – String Quintet in C major
Beethoven Symphony No 6 in F Major ‘Pastoral’
Elgar – Pomp & Circumstance March no 1 in D Major ‘Land of Hope and Glory’
Beethoven – Piano Concerto No 5 in E Flat Major ‘Emperor’
Elgar – Enigma Variations Nimrod
Beethoven – Symphony No 7 in A major

That’s not exactly Radio 1 (or 2 for that matter) is it?

Interviewees divide, for me, into two groups.  Those that truly love classical music and their list is wall to wall  classical with a token Frank Sinatra thrown in, and those that think a token classical piece or two will make them look more profound.  I’d likely have no classical in my choices but if I were to play that game it would be either Faure’s Requiem or Barber’s Adagio for Strings.

Look. There.  I’ve done it.

Faux Classicist.

But that minor criticism (and it’s of some of its interviewees not the show itself) Desert Island Discs really does deserve the tag “National Institution”.

Here’s to my grandchildren enjoying it at the turn of the 22nd century.

This incredible year of music.


What in God’s name has gone on in the music world this year?

In October alone we’ve had a major return to form from Belle and Sebatian and also by Sufjan Stevens. As well as a great new album from Robert Plant.

We’ve had album after album after album that continue to amaze. And yet 2008 and 2009 were, relatively speaking, deserts.

Next week we have a new Kings of Leon and before the end of the year a new Radiohead and, if Metacritic is to be believed, a new, wait for it, Kraftwerk album.

Oh my sweet Jesus.

There’s a new Norah Jones too. (I know, lacks credibility, but I love her music. Sorry.)

And just wait till you hear the crazy brilliance that is Sleigh Bell. Mama Mia!  On Spotify as we speak.  Please enjoy.

We’ve had Fourtet on fire, Massive Attack on fire, Hot Chip on fire.  The National on fire.

Wild Beasts, Midlake, John Grant, and of course, Arcade Fire. (On fire!)

Each and every one a gem of the highest lustre.

Wondrous.

The best of 2009 – music


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I’m getting ready to prepare this year’s opus and after a slow start to the year I think it’s gathered pace.  For those of you who don’t have any of my previous compilations the idea is that I choose my favourite songs and burn them onto a CD.  If you want the CD just ask.  In fact ask by commenting on this post.

Just don’t tell the MCPS (Even though this encourages the wider listeningto, and purchase of, music)

In fact. YIPPEE, I can do a best of the Noughties this year too!

 

Music Quiz Mayhem


Last years NABS winning team; Multiply

Last years NABS winning team; Multiply

This is when my willingness to help folk out comes back to bite me.  I have not one but two music quizzes planned in September, both for good causes and both with overlapping audiences so the questions will all have to be different.

Please support one or both of them.

On 3 September I will be doing one for Altzheimers Scotland to raise funds for Pete Mill who is doing a sponsored hike to Machu Pichu to raise money for them.  It’s £40 a team and is being kindly hosted by Hudson recruitment in The West End of Edinburgh.

More details here…

On 24 September it is the third annual NABS music Quiz at Newhaven Communications.  Previous nights have been a riot and very close fought affairs with Newhaven winning in 2007 and Multiply lifting the trophy in 2008.  It’s £100 for a team of four.

Let me know if you’d like to enter either of them as a team OR as an individual (we can match you up into a team).

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Out of the mire


In a remarkably poor end of season programme this band stood out like an oasis in the desert.

Indeed the interviewee that followed their first spot, Ray Davies, was transfixed and proclaimed them a cross between Blondie and Led Zepellin. The truth is they are a hybrid of LA and Cambodia. I don’t know how they’ve passed my by so far because they rock man.

They are Dengue Fever.

It looks like this is their signature song and was, in fact, the one that moved Ray Davies so much…

Actually, I think they’re a sort of modern day Cramps but from a different swamp.

Jools sadly primed the Hootenany, a show much compromised by his insidious limelight-seeking last year, by promising heaps of Jools stuff, like Ruby Turner. Worrabore.

Factory Records, Tony Wilson RIP


Kenneth Fowler wrote a brilliant tribute to Tony Wilson on his blog which I do not intend to attempt to upstage.

I was a huge fan of Factory records boasting recordings by Joy Division, New Order, The Wake, Crispy Ambulance, Happy Mondays, Cabaret Voltaire, The Durutti Column, OMD, and A Certain Ratio on this venerable label.

Just being on Factory Records was a thing of greatness and everything about the label was stylish.

But this is my favourite thing which I spotted as a callow youth.

The catalogue numbers were clearly an important part of the whole shtick.

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To demonstrate have a look at this list

FAC 25 – Closer by Joy Division – their second album

FAC 50 – Movement by New Order – Their first album

FAC 75 – Power Corruption and lies by New Order – also an album

FAC 100 – Low life by New Order – Their third album

FAC 150 – Brotheerhood by New Order – Their fourth Album

FAC 200 – Substance by New Order – Their best of album

FAC 250 – Substance by Joy Division- Their best of album

FAC 275 – Technique by New Order – Their fifth album

FAC 300 – An untiltled New Order Album released on Cassette only (only 5 copies were ever made)

FAC 350 – Not allocated

How cool is that? No Joy Division or New Order singles ever got a catalogue number ending in 25, 50, 75 or 00. Only albums. And, God knows, there were plenty of singles to be afforded that accolade.
I’ll pick my anorak up now shall I?