A remarkable rebrand for Investors in People (IIP) Scotland


Screen Shot 2017-07-31 at 15.52.54For some time now I’ve been working with IIP Scotland to help them on their journey through a rebrand that most people agree has had a pretty remarkable outcome. Along the way I enlisted the help of Front Page in Glasgow (website) Studio LR in Leith (identity) and 3X1 (PR) to help make the new brand for IIP Scotland truly remarkable.

IIP Scotland has been steadily growing its portfolio of services for some time now and is on the cusp of even more innovation. So, with an increasing emphasis on consultancy work, rather than offering only IIP accreditation, allied to the success of the Investors in Young People Award (a Scotland only initiative) and in anticipation of a slew of exciting new consultancy offers, the time was right for IIP Scotland to rebrand to reflect its growing portfolio of client-led services.

I was commissioned by the remarkable Peter Russian (if you know him you’ll know why I use that adjective to describe him) to conduct a comprehensive consultation process that sought the views of a cross section of staff, board members, clients and prospects to identify a clear new proposition for the organisation.

As an interim measure, the website was redesigned, after a pitch, by Front Page.

‘Love your business, love your people’ became the core communication and resulted in a far more engaging site.

On 20th June we witnessed the public unveiling of a new name, a new brand and a radically different look and feel.

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The result is Re:markable. With a colon. (But not in copy.)

The name reflects the fact that Remarkable (the new home for IIP in Scotland) delivers a world-class range of services. It helps organisations become more successful by developing and empowering their people to have increased control in their workplace.

It’s intended to be more dynamic, passionate and authoritative, with supportive and genuine Specialists (consultants).

The name reflects the fact that Remarkable makes a marked difference to the organisations it works with; and offers marks of quality (to include Investors in People in Scotland) and a world-class range of consultancy tools and services.

It’s a mark that recognises they are more able. And that’s remarkable.

It’s bold. That’s partly down to the board challenging us to think big, to be positive and to be radical.

But the marque itself is restrained, classical almost. That’s because we wanted to maintain a sense of authority and too much fuss with typography might just have been a step too far.

We commissioned a full new suite of photography using real people (clients, all of them) by Sam Sills that showed ordinary people doing their jobs remarkably.

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Working with a client that wasn’t willing to accept anything less than statement work was a real delight. And with agencies that gave their all was brilliant too.

An intelligent, thought provoking team that really walk their walk were a real pleasure to do business with and I believe they’ve been rewarded with an outcome that succeeds in completely repositioning their organisation.

And that’s been rewarded with tremendous initial results. The PR alone reached 7.5 million people (with 100% positive messaging), web traffic doubled, new visitors trebled, and I love this quote from the managing partner of one of Scotland’s largest law firms.

“It’s brilliant. It’s clean, fresh, and open to all sorts of innovative branding and marketing collateral. Great job and all the best as you all move forward to the next phase of getting the brand firmly established”


 

 

 

Dunkirk: Movie Review.


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It’s almost impossible to explain the extraordinary impact this movie has on you unless you have seen it.

In a movie that entirely engulfs you it’s rather unusual that the acting performances are almost unimportant.  Yes, Mark Rylance, as ever, puts no foot wrong but this is not a movie about acting. This is a movie about visceral experience.

This is a movie about paying double the price to experience it in an iMax.  Pay it man.

Christopher Nolan does not do anything less than 8.0 IMDB movies.  His class is overwhelming.  Interstellar blew me away with its imagination but this is a step up even again.

And one of the reasons for that is his relationship with Hams Zimmer.  This movie’s extraordaryness starts with the music which feeds off the utterly spectacular sound design by ( Help me I can’t find it on IMDB) xxx.

You are overwhelmed by the sound from frame 1.  Remember Saving Private Ryan?  Remember how you winced in your cinema seat.  That was the sound.  Now square that.  Hell, no.  Cube it.

Now, think how Saving Private Ryan Looked.  Think about how you squirmed in your seat.  Cube that too.

Now, think how after the first 20 minutes (if we are all honest her) it got a bit dull.

THAT DOES NOT HAPPEN WITH CHRISTOPHER NOLAN.

Christopher Nolan is the gift that just keeps giving.

This movie gives and gives and then gives a little more.

Costume, photography, sound, SFX (not much in CGI if anything) are all awesome.

This is an actual masterpiece.

I think it will win multiple Oscars, including best movie and director, with the rare distinction of no acting medals. (I hereby predict 10 Oscars.)

It’s a straight 10/10.

 

Kamasi Washington: Truth. Even if you don’t like jazz you will love this.


I can hardly believe that only 300,000 have viewed this at the time of writing.

It’s a piece called Truth by Kamasi Washington and please find 14 minutes in your life to watch this on fullscreen at full volume.

For those of you who don’t know, Kamasi Washington is an American Jazz Saxophonist and has worked extensively with Kendrick Lamar (on to Pimp a Butterfly. the best album of 2015) and many others.

It’s the final movement in a five movement piece conceived for the Whitney Museum in New York’s 2017 Biennial called Harmony of Difference and the film was directed by A G Rojas , a Barcelona based film director who’s also made videos for the likes of Jack White.

The centrepiece of the film fits the slow movement, within the movement as a whole, and features the longest, slowest zoom and pan you will ever see.  Orson Welles would be proud of it.

I first heard this on the amazing Giles Peterson show on BBC 6 Music (it’s a treasure trove of beautiful, jazz, jazz influenced and electronica that makes a Saturday afternoon a very fine thing – or listen to his show in download form on the BBC iPlayer).

Incidentally for the sharp eared among you the central six note theme (that’s introduced on the guitar) is virtually identical to Gorgeous George by Edwin Collins.  Not that I am criticising this, but it was nagging away at me as to what I knew it from.

Retina Festival 2017. (Celebrating photography at its very best)


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Get yourself along to Ocean Terminal in Leith to view the outstanding Emerging Talent show at the Image Collective Gallery on the top floor.

Retina is in its fourth year and over that period it has done more to showcase great photography in Scotland than just about anybody else.

This year is no different.  Indeed next Tuesday sees the opening of the Association of Photographers 2016 Photography Awards Show at Out of the Blue.

And there’s a great show by Hellen Van Meene and Bryn Griffiths at Summerhall until the 15th July.

But last night was about the newbies and I had the great pleasure of talking to two of them.  Both delightful human beings. Rod Penn

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In particular we had a long chat with Suzanne whose architectural series called Ethereal Industry multi layers images of beautiful industrial and agricultural units to creat a ghostly world of weird but truly beautiful structures.  She rightly won a BIPP award for this collection.

It’s brilliant.

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The Hungary Pavilion at Venice Biennale 2017. Our favourite.


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There’s much to savour at La Biennale but this was our collective favourite.

Here’s what they say about it.

“Peace on Earth!” by Gyula Várnai and curated by Zsolt Petrányi is a project based on the viability and the imminent need of utopias; it’s about the disillusion we have about the future and about the things that have not come true, but especially it’s a show concerning new technologies, global economies and natural crisis, giving the viewer the chance to make a deep reflection on a future that is growing faster than before.

The entire pavilion is just a stunning display of modern art but this piece stole it for us.

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The rainbow needs closer scrutiny.  Turns out is made up of a kaleidescope of 1960’s pin badges…

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Like this one…

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We didn’t see Gyula Várnai’s neon piece at night but this is how it looks

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The Biennale is incredible.  This won our vote.