A wee snippet from B2 Productions inaugural concert.
October 21, 2016, 11:18 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

A few tickets left for tomorrow night but you’ll have to be fast.

Super Soft Ice
October 18, 2016, 3:13 pm
Filed under: Arts, creativity, Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

Spitalfields Market, Shoreditch, Saturday October 15th, 2016.

The spirit of Punk’s not dead, 40 years on.

Supersoft ice.jpg

I do
October 18, 2016, 2:55 pm
Filed under: Arts, creativity, family, food, humour, life, photography, religion, Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

We were in Shoreditch, London at the weekend and found this great place called Dinerama.

Here’s what they say about themselves…

Dinerama is back roofed and winterproofed every Thu/Fri/Sat from 5pm to late. Tuck into Street Feast favourites Smokestak, Breddos, Yum Bun and Fundi, plus new heroes Farang and loads more. Head upstairs for Hot Wine and Frozen Toffee Vodka from Dick’s Magic T-Bar, proper cocktails from The Zephyr Lounge and tiki drinks in all the colours of the rumbow in the House of Bamboo.”

It’s a kind of warehouse/ popup venue with bars, DJ’s and lots of food.  It’s great fun.

This couple (Mandy and Reggie) were being married and I thought this image, shot through the reflection from inside the venue, as it poured with rain, was just magic.

I do.jpg

So much so that I got a whole bunch more…












The Girl With All The Gifts: Movie Review


OK I’m a sucker for a Zombie movie.  (One of my all time favourite genres.)

But this trumps mere Zombie movies.  This is a ‘kid’ Zombie movie and that raises the bar in its horrificness.

(That mask.)

(The wheelchairs.)

The main protagonist is a 10 year old Zombie being held captive in a military/medical establishment in the home counties with another 20 of her sort.

They are research fodder.

The charming, intelligent Melanie (played entirely convincingly and extremely empathetically throughout by debutant Sennia Nanua) it transpires has eaten herself out of her mother’s womb at the time that the world had fallen victim to a hideous fungal invasion that turned humans into Zombies.

Few have survived.

One is Melanie and her cronies’ teacher Helen Justineau (also well played by Gemma Arterton).  She and Melanie have a special bond that forms the backbone of the movie.

In the early establishing scenes the tension is palpable aided by an excellent soundtrack by  Cristobal Tapia de Veer, and when Paddy Considine (the good, bad guy army officer) lets  a classroom of the wheelchair bound critters have a ‘sniff’ of his humanity the reaction is unpleasant to say the least.

It becomes a road trip, as Zombie movies often do, with a series of set pieces gradually whittling down the cast (which includes the excellent Glenn Close) and gradually building the relationship between Arterton and Nanua; which is actually pretty believable.

Although the movie slightly outstays its welcome (one or two set ups too many I’d say) it’s good throughout.  Genuinely creepy, an original ‘take’ on the genre although borrowing heavily from 28 Days Later and, especially, I am Legend, which clearly inspired the excellent set-build and CGI effects of an abandoned London.

The ending lacks conviction but overall it’s a highly meritable addition to the Zombie canon.

One of the best in my opinion.

The paralympics. And why C4 is important.
September 18, 2016, 11:01 pm
Filed under: Arts, Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

Paralympic presenters 2016 Group--(None)_A2.jpg

We all know about the Superhumans and I’ve really enjoyed the Paralympics.

But in my professional life, not in TV but I feel  some empathy to this, it makes me have to comment.

The quality of the coverage of the Paralympics in Rio by Channel 4 is deserving of special mention.  It entirely justifies the taxpayers’ money for the station’s remit to reach out to outwith the mainstream.

Yes, Clair Balding is a national treasure.

But only because she is entirely professional.

But, beyond Clair, the mainly disabled commentary and pundit team were faultless.

It was TV Gold.

Thank you C4.

(And, by the way the BBC 5 Live team didn’t do such a bad job either.)


One More time with feeling; Review of Nick Cave documentary
September 9, 2016, 12:08 pm
Filed under: Arts, bbc, creativity, family, gigs, movies, music, Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

Don’t get me wrong I was willing, urging this film to be magnificent.  But will as I did, it isn’t.

In fact it’s like the ultimate home movie utilising the finest cinematographers money can buy (Benoit Debie and Alwin H Kuchler – I suspect one was on 2D duty, one on 3D – I saw it in 2D).

The back story is important here.  The documentary was commissioned to film the making of Cave’s brilliant new album, Skeleton Tree, (I know it’s brilliant because it was played in full on its release 11 hours ago on the BBC 6 Music Mary Anne Hobbs Show).  What nobody predicted was that it would become a film about grief because, as I understand the timing, no sooner had filming started than Cave’s 15 year old son, Arthur, died in a climbing accident.  The chronology of this is not clear in the film’s narrative.

When I read of Arthur’s death I was devastated for Nick Cave (I truly love the man) and so I expected the film to be an emotional roller coaster.

It isn’t.

Instead what we get is a strung out self indulgence piece.  And I don’t mean Nick Cave’s self indulgence, I mean Andrew Dominik’s. (Director of Cave-soundtracked, and awesome, movie The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford.)

It is sumptuously photographed and of course the music is stellar but the glue that binds it, the storyline, is fragmented, dull and seemingly endless.  OK, I accept Cave is a private man and he doesn’t want to spill his grief out on camera, his wife too, but when he describes breaking down in the arms of a virtual stranger on the High Street in Brighton we get a glimpse of what he is going through.

But that’s it.

My companion fell asleep several times.  Thanks partly to the heat in The Filmhouse, Edinburgh where we saw this.  Extremely uncomfortable.  Did they not know they had a sell out audience?

I don’t like being negative about a film of this nature but if Dominik had an Executive Producer with a firmer hand we might have seen a more pared down and rewarding experience.

If you want to see Nick Cave at his very best on film watch the far superior 20,000 Days on Earth, directed by Jane Pollard and Iain Forsyth.  It’s magnificent.


Total respect to Mars and Channel 4 (and thanks to David Reviews for publishing)
September 8, 2016, 12:42 pm
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As David Reviews says “This is one of three new commercials for Maltesers which won a competition launched by Channel 4 earlier in the year. The Paralympics broadcaster wanted to further its commitment to diversity by offering airtime to work which puts disability and diversity at the heart of a campaign.”

The commercial, one of three, is extremely “saucy” and  as Bodyform did earlier in the year  it has taken on a taboo subject (in their case menstruation; in this, disability) in a bold and confident manner.